Nonce – Bitcoin Wiki

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A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. A large percentage of Bitcoin enthusiasts are libertarians, though people of all political philosophies are welcome.
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What Is A Bitcoin Nonce [Simple]?

What Is A Bitcoin Nonce [Simple]? submitted by parakite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What Is A Bitcoin Nonce [Simple]?

What Is A Bitcoin Nonce [Simple]? submitted by parakite to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Is Antminer S9 hardware coming offline? The disappearance of an unusual pattern in the Bitcoin nonce value distribution may suggest so. Regardless, reports have surfaced that mining farms are upgrading to the latest generation hardware.

Is Antminer S9 hardware coming offline? The disappearance of an unusual pattern in the Bitcoin nonce value distribution may suggest so. Regardless, reports have surfaced that mining farms are upgrading to the latest generation hardware. submitted by johnleequigley1 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

The Mystery Of The Bitcoin Nonce Pattern

The Mystery Of The Bitcoin Nonce Pattern submitted by Bitcoin_21 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Nonce Question

Can’t the previous hash from the lowest nonce be used to get a hash that is lower than the target to reach the block reward to start? If this is possible, wouldn’t the “number” to solve the nonce keep decreasing each time until eventually we are left with lowest nonce possible- therefore it could keep being used because that lowest nonce would always be below the target?
submitted by mashpotatoboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Podcast] Simon from Token Analyst talks about whether or not gaps in Bitcoin nonces are a problem.

[Podcast] Simon from Token Analyst talks about whether or not gaps in Bitcoin nonces are a problem. submitted by ecurrencyhodler to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Nonce's from the beginning.

Bitcoin Nonce's from the beginning. submitted by randomusername102346 to dataisbeautiful [link] [comments]

Post Monero Meetup Report Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18

Post Monero Meetup Report Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18
"Then fluffy blessed the seventh commit and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which the Developers had created and made." Genesis 2:3
Monero Meetup Report

Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18

St. Andrew's Church
As a Church of Monero Missionary, I was very excited to visit Kiev, Ukraine to see their beautiful Orthodox Christian churches. They did not disappoint.
St. Michael's Cathedral
View from UBK Beach
The architecture in general was very beautiful.
Random Corner
Vozdvyzhenka
The culture here is very artistic:
Large wall mural
With plenty of wit:
https://preview.redd.it/eh9xze2234c11.jpg?width=4128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4a8e48f173db561098f6bd65310797a93496f567
https://preview.redd.it/si53jhj334c11.jpg?width=4128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=94b986ac5df4c700d97af7a0607a48be2c8115c0
A very interesting people here in Kiev. In the city center, I would say 50% speak English and 30% speak English well - the large majority speak Russian. My Uber driver from the airport spoke no English. 5 of my 12 days in Kiev I spent handing out fliers for the Monero Event I hosted. I passed out 300 fliers, interacting with at least 1000+ people in this process. Of the people I interacted with, 20% were familiar with Bitcoin and a significant percent of that group were enthusiastic about cryptocurrencies.
Independence Square
The main areas in Kiev are all accessible by foot. It was not unusual for me to walk 4 miles in one day passing out fliers, walking from people cluster to people cluster. There are several main areas of where people congregate:
  • From Arena City to Independance Square along Khreshchatyk Street
  • Near the National University Of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy
  • From Vozdvyzhenka to St. Andrew's Church
  • The Gulliver Mall
  • UBK Beach
People's Friendship Arch View
This is the flier I passed out to 300 people
Additionally the Blockchain Hub hosted an event on 17.7.18 that I went to where I made some new friends and advertised the meetup I was organizing. One of those friends spent 8 hours helping me translate my English Monero Presentation into Russian. Here is the link to the Google Slides English/Russian Presentation. I would say I spent a solid 20 hours working on the presentation. On the days I passed out fliers, I would alternate between 3 hours of passing out fliers and 3 hours inside working on the presentation.
I passed out fliers from 17.7.18 until 21.7.18. For every flier that I successfully passed out, I had on average 2 people reject the flier on the basis of disinterest, no interest, or language barrier. Most of the 300 fliers were passed out to groups of size 2-3. Many of the people who accepted the flier were also excited about cryptocurrency, said they would attend, and asked for another flier to give to their friend.
Seven people showed up to the event. Most of these 7 came either directly from the Blockchain Hub event or were a friend that those same people brought. No one that I gave a flier to came to the event. I have a recording of the event but the quality is actually quite poor. The recording does include the post-presentation discussion where I answered deeper questions about how Bitcoin works and how maybe at some point in the future the price of Bitcoin might closely correlate with the price of energy. I was explaining all this and technical functions like Bitcoin nonce hashing to a Russian only speaking attendee through my friend who would translate English/Russian. It was very helpful that my friend already has a solid foundation in how cryptocurrencies work.
Next stop on my trip is Brussels, Belgium where I hope to build from this Monero Mission trip and further spread the good word of Monero.
twitter.com/churchofmonero
submitted by Xeagu to Monero [link] [comments]

myetherwallet.com balance differs from etherscan.io

I have some investment ETH that's overdue to get into a paper wallet. I have this process nailed for bitcoin with bitaddress.org and an airgapped chromebook. For eth it seems more complicated.
I sent 0.1 ETH to the address here https://etherscan.io/address/0x3b9911d35a33e7636dfa373ea8c6d1e00811bfc8. It shows 0.1 ETH.
Then on myethwallet.com I did two 3-step offline transactions sending out, of 0.09 and 0.007. Somehow I must have garbled the transactions because they didn't clear. But myetherwallet.com shows "account balance 0.002139 ETH which looks about right as if the 0.09 and 0.007 cleared, plus fees.
I'm disappointed in the myetherwallet send functionality--why wouldn't it check harder for a garbled transaction? For instance, I can type in any just characters over a valid private key and it still allows the tx to be generated and sent on the network. When dealing with airgap etc it's a pain to not have it caught earlier.
It must be possible to check offline if the private key you type in matches the "From" address you also are required to type in. You type/copy in a From address, then type/copy in the private key, and it says "wallet successfully decrypted" which is a lie. Sure, it decrypted some wallet, but not the one you wanted to send from. So it's kinda useless to say "everything is great, get ready to send your transaction" and then have it go kaboom on the network because the private key is wrong.
Also, sending is pretty complicated compared to bitcoin: Nonce and gas price and gas limit. Bitcoin's private key, To address, and fee concepts are easier.
submitted by sandball to ethereum [link] [comments]

Let's Decentralise the World and Make World Crypto Network a Distributed Autonomous Organisation

Decentralise the World

EDIT 2014-08-01 See also pierebel0 Seed the Chain
Please read this carefully and be forthcoming with your views. It’s important to the future of World Crypto Network.
As many of you may know pierebel0 (Nick) and I have been working on an idea and since then we have been putting together diagrams and a plan.
Basically we want to get open source software to regions of the world that have poor internet connectivity and are in need of most financial innovation. This would be like an airdrop of items including:
Nick's initial idea was to produce a list of villages and towns ranked by bandwidth and we would then give each place a Bitcoin donation address.
We could use a map of the world using the open source CoinMap. A page on the World Crypto Net website called Join the Revolution. Members of the audience, hosts of the show and any willing participants in the global campaign can sign up and put themselves on the map.
We could then setup a Bitcoin Wallet in Armory and assign a Bitcoin address for every viable village and town in the world.
Our audience will be invited to vote on which town or village they wanted as to do an Open Source Airdrop on by sending bitcoins to that address. Each donation would be like a vote. We would set targets on each location based on the most cost effective way of delivering it and then let the market decide what order we should go in. We would probably want to weight it to regions that had the most potential to benefit from the project.

World Crypto Network as a DAO (Distributed Autonomous Organisation)

Now the next question that came up is how to handle the funds responsibly?
Up until now people have just trusted Thom and I and sent us money. But if we are going to practice what we preach in this brave new community then what better opportunity to try out a DAO. Recently I reinstalled Bitcoin Armory to try out the new Multisig and multipart paper backup features and I suggest the following process for discussion:
  1. Live Town Hall meeting on Youtube with plenty of advance warning with members of our audience who have followed us up until now to discuss the election process of 7 people who will be custodians of Bitcoin Armory Wallet.
Key decisions will be things like: * How the election should take place? * Using the block chain as a clock on which Bitcoin Block should it commence? e.g. the election takes place at block height #312,020
Once elected each person is given a number at random.
  1. A custodian of the funds is selected at random using the first number in the Bitcoin nonce at block #312,017 between 1 and 7. This way none of the elected 7 will know if they are going to be in charge. This should filter out any power hungry psychopaths as mostly they want control right now and not leave it to chance. We want any would be dictator to self-deselect themselves from this process.
  2. That custodian then produces an Armory wallet consisting of a 5 of 7 paper backup. Each elected member is given one each and the custodian keeps the master copy. In order for the wallet to be restored and funds to be spendable you would need 5 people out of the seven to collude or join together in protest against the custodian.
Everyone, the audience and elected 7 included are encouraged to publish their raw public keys (in hex, not the normal address) so that we can create ad hoc multi-sig wallets with one another on a project by project basis.
I would also like to include the ability for the audience to become hosts and participants and even allow them to seize the funds by co-operating with members of the elected 7. This would mean dividing up 1 of the 7 root keys in to smaller junks like with a multiple encrypted zip file or something.

Thoughts and things to consider:

What I particularly like about splitting up the keys is that we could even engineer it to make sure that no more than 2 members of staff are elected per country. That way no single authority could shut down the World Crypto Network.
It’s also important to note that the elected staff and random custodian are just admin staff. Everyone’s a leader at WCN and the role of the people at the top is to give the people at the bottom everything they need to get their job done. All the custodian is doing it making sure the web hosting is paid for and that the donations get sent to the right people.
Individuals within the organisation are still responsible for their own projects and fundraising. None of the elected 7 can stop you from soliciting money for your hard work. But they might come in handy if you want to set up a project for a 3rd party like Let’s get Nepal on a Meshnet and you would like to setup a 2 of 3 multisig wallet of which one of them could be the custodian. This would lend you credibility when you market your project and make people more likely to donate.
We could also not bother with the initial election and just self appoint the first 7 people and just rotate the duties every 15,000 blocks.
Also Thornbreaker (Jamie Nelson) mentioned that we should come up with a manifesto. I think this is a good idea and we could do it on Github or a Wiki.
Thank-you for your time, I look forward to your reading thoughts.
submitted by MrChrisJ to worldcryptonetwork [link] [comments]

Post Monero Meetup Report Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18

Post Monero Meetup Report Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18
"Then fluffy blessed the seventh commit and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which the Developers had created and made." Genesis 2:3
Monero Meetup Report

Kiev, Ukraine 22.7.18

St. Andrew's Church
As a Church of Monero Missionary, I was very excited to visit Kiev, Ukraine to see their beautiful Orthodox Christian churches. They did not disappoint.
St. Michael's Cathedral
View from UBK Beach
The architecture in general was very beautiful.
Random corner
Vozdvyzhenka
The culture here is very artistic:
Large wall mural
With plenty of wit:
https://preview.redd.it/u346cz1um3c11.jpg?width=4128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a820464e4f75bd7d8ea4e6ad3a8e42ed7e0b413d
https://preview.redd.it/3ec8ve0xm3c11.jpg?width=4128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=aea96c2fbcd662dec08f38c6141e53363d9e5231
A very interesting people here in Kiev. In the city center, I would say 50% speak English and 30% speak English well - the large majority speak Russian. My Uber driver from the airport spoke no English. 5 of my 12 days in Kiev I spent handing out fliers for the Monero Event I hosted. I passed out 300 fliers, interacting with at least 1000+ people in this process. Of the people I interacted with, 20% were familiar with Bitcoin and a significant percent of that group were enthusiastic about cryptocurrencies.
Independence Square
The main areas in Kiev are all accessible by foot. It was not unusual for me to walk 4 miles in one day passing out fliers, walking from people cluster to people cluster. There are several main areas of where people congregate:
  • From Arena City to Independance Square along Khreshchatyk Street
  • Near the National University Of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy
  • From Vozdvyzhenka to St. Andrew's Church
  • The Gulliver Mall
  • UBK Beach
People's Friendship Arch View
This is the flier I passed out to 300 people
Additionally the Blockchain Hub hosted an event on 17.7.18 that I went to where I made some new friends and advertised the meetup I was organizing. One of those friends spent 8 hours helping me translate my English Monero Presentation into Russian. Here is the link to the Google Slides English/Russian Presentation. I would say I spent a solid 20 hours working on the presentation. On the days I passed out fliers, I would alternate between 3 hours of passing out fliers and 3 hours inside working on the presentation.
I passed out fliers from 17.7.18 until 21.7.18. For every flier that I successfully passed out, I had on average 2 people reject the flier on the basis of disinterest, no interest, or language barrier. Most of the 300 fliers were passed out to groups of size 2-3. Many of the people who accepted the flier were also excited about cryptocurrency, said they would attend, and asked for another flier to give to their friend.
Seven people showed up to the event. Most of these 7 came either directly from the Blockchain Hub event or were a friend that those same people brought. No one that I gave a flier to came to the event. I have a recording of the event but the quality is actually quite poor. The recording does include the post-presentation discussion where I answered deeper questions about how Bitcoin works and how maybe at some point in the future the price of Bitcoin might closely correlate with the price of energy. I was explaining all this and technical functions like Bitcoin nonce hashing to a Russian only speaking attendee through my friend who would translate English/Russian. It was very helpful that my friend already has a solid foundation in how cryptocurrencies work.
Next stop on my trip is Brussels, Belgium where I hope to build from this Monero Mission trip and further spread the good word of Monero.
twitter.com/churchofmonero
submitted by Xeagu to ChurchOfMonero [link] [comments]

Making someone Prove they own bitcoin

At first you might think this is solved --
Pretend I wanted a new bitcoin subreddit - called 'BitcoinVerified' where the goal is to keep people that have no skin in the game (Trolls) out.
The problem is that there are many people out there, some of whom, like the curious, have no bitcoin, and some don't want any (Trolls). Pretend for now that I don't care about the curious newbies (even though I was one once).
Instead, I want a forum where you actually have to have bitcoin to participate. But not spend any, just prove you have some. I need to have someone prove that they have bitcoin, a decent little amount, like 10 Bitcoin, or some other configurable amount, before they can participate.
For simple starting purposes assume that they have to have an address with some minimum amount of bitcoin in it, and we ask them to sign a random message at that address.
Assume we ask periodically, and often enough that the trolls aren't going to go in and out of bitcoin every day ...
So in the naive system, we ask that a troll sign their address with a specific but random message and tell it to them: eg "Yes I love bitcoin, nonce goes here".
Problem is that of course a pack of trolls could keep a common address and a central troll accountant could sign whatever message they want for them.
What I want instead is - something like a 2 of 3 signature hash where the trolls have to forward bitcoin to a specific spot. And if after it goes there it's legit - I sign it, they sign it, the bitcoin is unlocked - or time passes as the third lock - then no problem, they are verified.
But here's the sweet idea - if someone trusted a troll with their bitcoins in order to sign a message, then the troll could scam the truster by making up a pretend pay to script hash address.
I would communicate what address to send it to privately. I couldn't steal their bitcoin, but they could scam someone else.
I don't like it very much but it's the best I can come up with.
Any way to make a troll verifier work so that people can't trust the trolls that are also scammers?
I want to make it set up so that there's no way the troll could actually sign a message without knowing the private key, OR barring that, making it so that whoever won't share the actual private key to a troll - CAN'T be sure that the troll won't scam them by telling them to send it to an address under the troll's control (scammer's control).
submitted by walloon5 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

LadderLeak: Breaking ECDSA With Less Than One Bit Of Nonce Leakage - is this relevant for Bitcoin?

submitted by BitcoinReminder_com to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Proposal: meta-ethereum - mining and monetary policy as contracts

I'm quite excited about Ethereum's stateful contract feature. However, I'm concerned if other design choices, such as mining algorithm or monetary policy, will lead to the whole bundle of traits surviving the rough and tumble of the cryptocurrency ecosystem, or if one good idea (say stateful contracts) will go down due to other design choices (suppose the mining algorithm has a fatal flaw discovered later).
What if the core ethereum codebase was abstracted so that the mining work, mining verification, and monetary policies were all specified as special contracts?
For example, there might be a new field added to the block header which stores the code hash for a special platform contract. The platform contract would have state like the normal user contracts.
It would have access to privileged opcodes which could do things such as reading/writing any user contract's state.
It would take as input a previous block header, a list of transactions, the miner's address, and a deterministic CSPRNG seed. It's output would be a new block header.
The "base" account balances would be part of the platform contract's storage state, which allows it to implement any monetary policy, such as for example rewarding the miner address. If mining requires a proof-of-work system like bitcoin's nonce guesses, this would be implemented as an internal loop.
The end result would be that different block chains could all run the same software platform, merely with different initial block states, which would include different platform contracts. Perhaps these different blockchains could even have tighter interaction features due to running on a common software platform.
I'm sure I saw something similar to this mentioned somewhere, so links are appreciated, and credit goes where due.
edit: Note that since the platform contract outputs a new block header, which includes a platform contract identifier, it is possible to implement adaptive blockchains. For example, it would be possible to change a proof-of-work algorithm according to a voting scheme.
submitted by crypto-tim to ethereum [link] [comments]

Giving away Reddit golds to those who tell me a fact about btc i didn't know. (Being honest)

submitted by justinCrypto to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Jimmy Song, Nonce, Programming Bitcoin, Maximalist, 블록체인

Jimmy Song, Nonce, Programming Bitcoin, Maximalist, 블록체인 submitted by treatscar to u/treatscar [link] [comments]

@nadiaheninger and Joachim Breitner discoverer nonce biases in several Bitcoin ECDSA implementations. They were able to recover 300 Bitcoin private keys holding a whopping $54.

@nadiaheninger and Joachim Breitner discoverer nonce biases in several Bitcoin ECDSA implementations. They were able to recover 300 Bitcoin private keys holding a whopping $54. submitted by Aussiehash to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The bitcoin blockchain and ECDSA Nonce Reuse Private Key recovery attacks made easy.

submitted by -tin- to netsec [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost

Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost submitted by sexyama to crypto_currency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost

Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost submitted by WebSwiftSEO to CryptocurrencyVideos [link] [comments]

World Crypto Network - HTLC Micropayments, Dust Limit, Lightning Invoice Expiry, Nonce Reuse ~ Bitcoin OpTech #44

World Crypto Network - HTLC Micropayments, Dust Limit, Lightning Invoice Expiry, Nonce Reuse ~ Bitcoin OpTech #44 submitted by Yanlii to cryptovideos [link] [comments]

aantonop - Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost

aantonop - Bitcoin Q&A: Nonce, entropy, and ASICBoost submitted by Yanlii to cryptovideos [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Q&A: Iterating nonces and the block reward Bitcoin Q&A: Nonces, mining, and quantum computing Blockchain Primer - Merkle Tree, DAG, Consensus, Nonce, ... How Bitcoin mining actually works - What is the ... What Bitcoin Miners Actually Do

Nonce. A number used to help with mining. The nonce is a field in the block header.. I call it “the mining field”. Nonce is an abbreviation of number used once. cryptography.wikia.com. What’s it used for? Miners adjust the nonce when they’re trying to get the hash of their block headers below the target. (i.e. Get a valid Block Hash for their candidate block.) In Bitcoin's mining process, the goal is to find a hash below a target number which is calculated based on the difficulty. Proof-of-work in Bitcoin's mining takes an input consists of Merkle Root, timestamp, previous block hash and few other things plus a nonce which is completely random number. If the output results in hash is smaller than the target hash you win the block and the consensus ... Nonce («number that can only be used once») ist ein Einmal-Code, eine dynamische Überwindung oder Pseudozufallsart. Es wird verwendet, um die Übertragung hauptsächlich zu biopsieren, um die Macht der Reproduktion zu nehmen. Im Bitcoin-Mining-Prozess besteht das Ziel darin, unter einer Zielnummer einen Hashwert zu finden, der anhand der Schwierigkeit berechnet wird. Proof-of-Work in ... The "nonce" in a bitcoin block is a 32-bit (4-byte) field whose value is adjusted by miners so that the hash of the block will be less than or equal to the current target of the network. The rest of the fields may not be changed, as they have a defined meaning. Any change to the block data (such as the nonce) will make the block hash completely different. Since it is believed infeasible to ... Die "nonce" in einem Bitcoin Block ist ein 32-Bit (4-Byte) Feld, dessen Wert so eingestellt ist, dass der Hash-Block eine Serie von Nullen enthält. Der Rest der Felder sollte nicht geändert werden, da sie eine definierte Bedeutung haben. Jede Änderung der Daten des Blocks (so wie die nonce) verändert den Hash-Block komplett. Da es unmöglich ist, vorherzusagen welche Kombination von Bits ...

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Bitcoin Q&A: Iterating nonces and the block reward

blockchain primer - Merkle Tree, DAG, Consensus, Nonce, ... Resources: The great BOOK: "Mastering Bitcoin": http://amzn.to/2BqmgNI * Home page: https://tomer... He is the author of two books: “Mastering Bitcoin,” published by O’Reilly Media and considered the best technical guide to bitcoin; “The Internet of Money,” a book about why bitcoin matters. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. In this video I try to breakdown the "cryptographic problem" that people reference when they talk about bitcoin mining. He is the author of two books: “Mastering Bitcoin,” published by O’Reilly Media and considered the best technical guide to bitcoin; “The Internet of Money,” a book about why bitcoin matters.

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